What does nebbish mean in Yiddish?

What does Nebuch mean?

interj., adv. “Unfortunately.” n. An unfortunate person. adj.

What does nebbish in Yiddish mean?

The unfortunate Pa unwittingly demonstrates much about the etymology of nebbish, which derives from the Yiddish nebekh, meaning “poor” or “unfortunate.” As you might expect for a timid word like nebbish, the journey from Yiddish to English wasn’t accomplished in a single bold leap of spelling and meaning.

What does Schmegegge mean?

Definitions of schmegegge. (Yiddish) baloney; hot air; nonsense. synonyms: shmegegge. type of: bunk, hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality. a message that seems to convey no meaning.

What does Nokhshleper mean in Yiddish?

A nuchshlepper (nokhshlepper in Standard Yiddish) is a person who tags along where it’s clear that he isn’t wanted; he’s either too stupid or too desperate to take a hint. The verb nokhshlepn means “to drag after”; a nokhshleper is a follower whom you have no desire to lead.

What is a mensch?

The word “Mensch”, in Yiddish, is “someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character.

Is Mensch a compliment?

The key to being ‘a real mensch’ is nothing less than character, rectitude, dignity, a sense of what is right, responsible, decorous.” The term is used as a high compliment, implying the rarity and value of that individual’s qualities. …

Is Schmuck a bad word?

Although schmuck is considered an obscene term in Yiddish, it has become a common American idiom for “jerk” or “idiot”. It can be taken as offensive, however, by some Jews, particularly those with strong Yiddish roots.

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What is a Kochleffel?

A Kochleffel is a busybody—someone who stirs things and people up.) 1 Kochleffel syndrome is widespread and relatively contagious and is transmitted by an as yet unidentified agent, usually by word of mouth. Its manifestations are protean and may mimic several other illnesses.

Who is HaShem God?

In Judaism, HaShem (lit. ‘the Name’) is used to refer to God, particularly as an epithet for the Tetragrammaton, when avoiding God’s more formal title, Adonai (‘my master’).

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